Do boomerangs actually return?/>

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Cuffs, May 16, 2018.

  1. Cuffs

    Cuffs Well-Known Member
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    Believe it or not, though, not all boomerangs come back. So what do you call a boomerang that doesn't come back? A stick! OK, that may be an old joke, but there's certainly some truth to it.

    Not all boomerangs are designed to come back. Boomerangs were first invented thousands of years ago as weapons. As throwing sticks, they were designed to use to hunt animals for food. They were meant to bring down game, not to fly through the air and return to the thrower.

    The oldest Australian boomerangs used by native peoples are over 10,000 years old. Even older hunting sticks have been found in Europe, though. A mammoth's tusk used as a hunting stick was found in the mountains of Poland, and it dates back about 30,000 years.

    Returning boomerangs developed from throwing sticks used for hunting. Like the Frisbee, their main purpose has always been mainly for sport or leisure — just the sheer pleasure of throwing the boomerang the right way so that it returns to the thrower.

    However, returning boomerangs can be used for hunting, too. For example, a returning boomerang can be used as a bird decoy. Thrown over areas of long grass where game birds nest, returning boomerangs can frighten these birds into taking flight, thus making them easier to hunt.

    Returning boomerangs have a special curved shape and two or more wings that will spin to create unbalanced aerodynamic forces. These forces — sometimes called “lift" — cause the boomerang's path to curve in an elliptical shape, so that it will return to the thrower when thrown correctly.

    Boomerangs have often been made of wood. There is evidence, though, that the first boomerangs may have been made of bone. Today, boomerangs can be made from a wide variety of materials, including wood, plastic and space-age composite materials.

    Most modern boomerangs are returning boomerangs. They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Most of them are used for sport. There are many boomerang competitions around the world every year.

    Throwers compete in all sorts of skill areas, such as farthest throw, accuracy of return and longest time aloft. David Schummy of Australia holds the Guinness World Record for longest boomerang throw at an incredible 1,401.5 feet!

    The real question is, why is there a hole in the Ozone layer above australia, like what were the aboriginals doing 10000 years ago...???


    Aboriginal Rock Painting of a UFO.... All aboard the sus bus
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  2. s8ncaat

    s8ncaat Community Manager
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  3. Bailey

    Bailey Forum Addict
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    Yes. The big fuckers are the hard ones to throw because they're the ones you club the kangas over the head with.

    I've got one of them big bastards above my bed, gonna fuck up some intruders using my roots aye man. I've also got one of them ones that come back, but you gotta throw it like its a frisby that goes over your head.

    As a sign of peace, I'll say a traditional aboriginal greeting.

    Got a dolla for da bus cunt?
    Where's my dard aye?

    Have a lovely day my couth sir.
     
  4. Cuffs

    Cuffs Well-Known Member
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    Namisday good sir
     
  5. Twat (Bill)

    Twat (Bill) Active Member

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    You have legs, go run after it and stop being lazy.
    I do prefer just flying a drone into birds for my dinner but boomerangs may be good.
     
  6. Deadly

    Deadly Well-Known Member
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    are you trying to culturally appropriate my culture that I appropriate? How dare you
     
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  7. Aussi

    Aussi Forum Addict
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